The 2020 Mid-Year Economic Update_long

March 25 2010

Volume 40, Issue 6

Volume:

40

Issue:

6

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Features
This is the pdf of this issue of Modern Distribution Management. Apply the full $24.95 pay-per-view cost toward an annual subscription (within 30 days of purchase), which includes two issues a month plus access to more than seven years of online archives and market data. Call 1-888-742-5060 or email info@mdm.com to subscribe.
MDM4006-cover
MDM Editor Lindsay Konzak recently sat down with the leaders of Ferguson to talk about where they see the company going post-recession. They also discussed the joint venture Wolseley entered into last year for Stock Building Supply – in which it now has only a minority position – and what that means for Wolseley's positioning in North America.

In this interview:

  • Frank Roach, CEO, Ferguson

  • Kevin Murphy, COO, Ferguson

  • Steve Petock, Senior Vice President, Business Groups, Ferguson

  • Jim Feltman, CMO, Senior Vice President, Ferguson

  • MDM: After a couple of down years, where does Ferguson sit?

    Frank Roach: Over the past several years the driving theme in Wolseley's North American group was to centralize back-office cost and collaborate when appropriate between the individual companies: Ferguson, Stock Building Supply and Wolseley Canada.

    The exposure Stock had to the new residential construction market – which was roughly 80 percent of their business –

    Indicators the past month have largely been positive across most distribution sectors. And at industry meetings, executives are looking forward instead of down. That's a great change from a very tough year. At the same time, I have not heard anyone say we are out of the woods.

    From our surveys, we found that many distributors were forced to use layoffs to stay viable, and many more did everything in their power to avoid layoffs or use them as creatively as possible.

    The authors of Value Creation Strategies for Wholesaler-Distributors implore distributors to define strategy in terms of closing gaps with the market rather than operational weaknesses. Tactically driven initiatives may meet intermediate goals, but they often produce unsatisfactory business outcomes.

    This is an excerpt from Value Creation Strategies for Wholesaler-Distributors reprinted with permission from the NAW Institute for Distribution Excellence. Order the book at www.naw.org/valuecreationstrateg.

    Strictly speaking, best practices are business operations that are statistically correlated with superior financial performance. The study of best practices is now widespread and has contributed to significant productivity improvements by wholesaler-distributors across all lines of trade. The most comprehensive review of distribution …

    Wind, rain, snow: Severe weather plagued much of the U.S. during the first months of 2010, with the East Coast bearing the brunt of the damage. And several economic indicators reflected the damage in the latest round of numbers.

    "Severe weather across the coasts of the United States last month disrupted transportation schedules," said Daniel J. Meckstroth, chief economist for the Manufacturers Alliance/MAPI, commenting on the latest Federal Reserve industrial production statistics. "Production in consumer durables industries was particularly affected."

    Industrial production edged …

    PDF Download
    This is the pdf of this issue of Modern Distribution Management. Apply the full $24.95 pay-per-view cost toward an annual subscription (within 30 days of purchase), which includes two issues a month plus access to more than seven years of online archives and market data. Call 1-888-742-5060 or email info@mdm.com to subscribe.
    MDM4006-cover
    MDM Editor Lindsay Konzak recently sat down with the leaders of Ferguson to talk about where they see the company going post-recession. They also discussed the joint venture Wolseley entered into last year for Stock Building Supply – in which it now has only a minority position – and what that means for Wolseley's positioning in North America.

    In this interview:

  • Frank Roach, CEO, Ferguson

  • Kevin Murphy, COO, Ferguson

  • Steve Petock, Senior Vice President, Business Groups, Ferguson

  • Jim Feltman, CMO, Senior Vice President, Ferguson

  • MDM: After a couple of down years, where does Ferguson sit?

    Frank Roach: Over the past several years the driving theme in Wolseley's North American group was to centralize back-office cost and collaborate when appropriate between the individual companies: Ferguson, Stock Building Supply and Wolseley Canada.

    The exposure Stock had to the new residential construction market – which was roughly 80 percent of their business –

    Indicators the past month have largely been positive across most distribution sectors. And at industry meetings, executives are looking forward instead of down. That's a great change from a very tough year. At the same time, I have not heard anyone say we are out of the woods.

    From our surveys, we found that many distributors were forced to use layoffs to stay viable, and many more did everything in their power to avoid layoffs or use them as creatively as possible.

    The authors of Value Creation Strategies for Wholesaler-Distributors implore distributors to define strategy in terms of closing gaps with the market rather than operational weaknesses. Tactically driven initiatives may meet intermediate goals, but they often produce unsatisfactory business outcomes.

    This is an excerpt from Value Creation Strategies for Wholesaler-Distributors reprinted with permission from the NAW Institute for Distribution Excellence. Order the book at www.naw.org/valuecreationstrateg.

    Strictly speaking, best practices are business operations that are statistically correlated with superior financial performance. The study of best practices is now widespread and has contributed to significant productivity improvements by wholesaler-distributors across all lines of trade. The most comprehensive review of distribution …

    Wind, rain, snow: Severe weather plagued much of the U.S. during the first months of 2010, with the East Coast bearing the brunt of the damage. And several economic indicators reflected the damage in the latest round of numbers.

    "Severe weather across the coasts of the United States last month disrupted transportation schedules," said Daniel J. Meckstroth, chief economist for the Manufacturers Alliance/MAPI, commenting on the latest Federal Reserve industrial production statistics. "Production in consumer durables industries was particularly affected."

    Industrial production edged …

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