The 2020 Mid-Year Economic Update_long

November 25 2012

Defense Cuts Hit Distributors

Volume:

42

Issue:

22

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Features

With the election over, most of the attention on Washington has returned to the looming “fiscal cliff” and the potential broad-stroke cuts to government programs, with particularly large cuts targeting the Department of Defense. MDM spoke with distributors and manufacturers about the impact of defense and other government spending cuts on business and how they have responded to the shifts that have already occurred.

In 2011, a congressional super-committee failed to come up with a plan to cut $1.2 trillion from the U.S. budget. As a result, a slate of across-the-board cuts was put into motion, automatically slashing ...

In Producing Prosperity: Why America Needs a Manufacturing Renaissance, Harvard Business School professors Gary Pisano and Willy Shih explain their view that when U.S. companies outsource their manufacturing operations, much of the country’s ability to innovate and compete goes overseas, as well. Shih, a professor of management practice, spoke with MDM staff writer Angela Poulson on why a manufacturing renaissance would bolster the U.S. economy. He also discusses the importance of building and maintaining “industrial commons” to fuel this revival.

MDM: Why did you write this book?

Willy C. Shih: Our main purpose was to elevate the discussion in this country on what we think is a very important topic. There is a lot of high-level, circumstantial discussion about manufacturing and jobs, and what we really wanted to do is get a more detailed discussion going so that policy makers and leaders in the industry and the public sector can have a more intelligent discussion about core issues.

MDM: Your book’s subtitle is Why America Needs a Manufacturing Renaissance. Broadly speaking, why does the U.S. need a manufacturing renaissance, and how in this case do you define one?

This is the time of year when projections for the year ahead are made, plans solidified and (sometimes) fingers crossed. This has been a strong year of growth for our company, and I thank you for your business. It is a key indicator that through good planning and hard work by our team, we have been meeting some ongoing and emerging market needs.

Through an annual strategic planning process, we have built a framework to gain feedback from our customers and the industry we serve. Next month, we’ll publish our ...

This article looks at how one distribution sector is tackling the data standardization challenge in collaboration with manufacturers and end-users through the Foodservice GS1 US Standards Initiative.

National foodservice redistributor Dot Foods has used EDI to automate transactions with suppliers for many years. But when product data between manufacturers and distributors doesn’t match, “all that efficiency goes out the window,” says Debbie Bower, e-commerce manager for Dot Foods, Mt. Sterling, IL. When ...

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With the election over, most of the attention on Washington has returned to the looming “fiscal cliff” and the potential broad-stroke cuts to government programs, with particularly large cuts targeting the Department of Defense. MDM spoke with distributors and manufacturers about the impact of defense and other government spending cuts on business and how they have responded to the shifts that have already occurred.

In 2011, a congressional super-committee failed to come up with a plan to cut $1.2 trillion from the U.S. budget. As a result, a slate of across-the-board cuts was put into motion, automatically slashing ...

In Producing Prosperity: Why America Needs a Manufacturing Renaissance, Harvard Business School professors Gary Pisano and Willy Shih explain their view that when U.S. companies outsource their manufacturing operations, much of the country’s ability to innovate and compete goes overseas, as well. Shih, a professor of management practice, spoke with MDM staff writer Angela Poulson on why a manufacturing renaissance would bolster the U.S. economy. He also discusses the importance of building and maintaining “industrial commons” to fuel this revival.

MDM: Why did you write this book?

Willy C. Shih: Our main purpose was to elevate the discussion in this country on what we think is a very important topic. There is a lot of high-level, circumstantial discussion about manufacturing and jobs, and what we really wanted to do is get a more detailed discussion going so that policy makers and leaders in the industry and the public sector can have a more intelligent discussion about core issues.

MDM: Your book’s subtitle is Why America Needs a Manufacturing Renaissance. Broadly speaking, why does the U.S. need a manufacturing renaissance, and how in this case do you define one?

This is the time of year when projections for the year ahead are made, plans solidified and (sometimes) fingers crossed. This has been a strong year of growth for our company, and I thank you for your business. It is a key indicator that through good planning and hard work by our team, we have been meeting some ongoing and emerging market needs.

Through an annual strategic planning process, we have built a framework to gain feedback from our customers and the industry we serve. Next month, we’ll publish our ...

This article looks at how one distribution sector is tackling the data standardization challenge in collaboration with manufacturers and end-users through the Foodservice GS1 US Standards Initiative.

National foodservice redistributor Dot Foods has used EDI to automate transactions with suppliers for many years. But when product data between manufacturers and distributors doesn’t match, “all that efficiency goes out the window,” says Debbie Bower, e-commerce manager for Dot Foods, Mt. Sterling, IL. When ...