The 2020 Mid-Year Economic Update_long

February 11 2019

Shutdown Ends, Federal Business Questions Remain

Volume:

49

Issue:

3

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Features
4903Cover

This is the PDF of this issue of Modern Distribution Management.

Table of Contents:

  • Shutdown Ends, Federal Business Questions Remain
  • Commentary: 3 Lessons for Distributors from Dental Industry Lawsuits
  • Antitrust Actions Hit Dental Distribution Hard
  • MDM Interview: The Transformation Journey of Lawson Products
  • Monthly Wholesale Trade Data: November 2018
  • Market Snapshot: Market Demand for Power Tools
  • MDM News Digest 4903

Are you a subscriber? Simply log-in to view this issue.

A series of antitrust lawsuits and other legal actions over the last several years will end up costing the largest three dental distributors in the U.S. upwards of $100 million in settlement fines and legal fees. Its an expensive lesson in how fairly common practices in distribution (and other industries) can turn into major liabilities.

Subscribers should log-in below to read this article.

Anticompetitive conduct lawsuits over several years are adding up to an estimated $100 million or more in settlement and legal fees for the three largest U.S. dental supplies distributors. A Federal Trade Commission case is still underway. Heres a summary of the cases, how these companies got into trouble and lessons for distributors across all sectors.

Subscribers should log-in below to read this article.

Since the Great Recession of 2008-2009, few publicly-traded companies have undertaken as much change in sales model, technology platform, process improvement and culture as Chicago-based Lawson Products. From 2009 to 2013, Lawson converted all of its sales representatives from a network of independent sales agents to sales employees, today numbering 1,000. MDM last talked with President and CEO Michael DeCata in 2014, who outlined the unique service-focused value proposition and changes taking place at the time. Four years after transitioning its sales model, we check in again for a progress report.

Subscribers should log-in below to read this article.

PDF Download
4903Cover

This is the PDF of this issue of Modern Distribution Management.

Table of Contents:

  • Shutdown Ends, Federal Business Questions Remain
  • Commentary: 3 Lessons for Distributors from Dental Industry Lawsuits
  • Antitrust Actions Hit Dental Distribution Hard
  • MDM Interview: The Transformation Journey of Lawson Products
  • Monthly Wholesale Trade Data: November 2018
  • Market Snapshot: Market Demand for Power Tools
  • MDM News Digest 4903

Are you a subscriber? Simply log-in to view this issue.

A series of antitrust lawsuits and other legal actions over the last several years will end up costing the largest three dental distributors in the U.S. upwards of $100 million in settlement fines and legal fees. Its an expensive lesson in how fairly common practices in distribution (and other industries) can turn into major liabilities.

Subscribers should log-in below to read this article.

Anticompetitive conduct lawsuits over several years are adding up to an estimated $100 million or more in settlement and legal fees for the three largest U.S. dental supplies distributors. A Federal Trade Commission case is still underway. Heres a summary of the cases, how these companies got into trouble and lessons for distributors across all sectors.

Subscribers should log-in below to read this article.

Since the Great Recession of 2008-2009, few publicly-traded companies have undertaken as much change in sales model, technology platform, process improvement and culture as Chicago-based Lawson Products. From 2009 to 2013, Lawson converted all of its sales representatives from a network of independent sales agents to sales employees, today numbering 1,000. MDM last talked with President and CEO Michael DeCata in 2014, who outlined the unique service-focused value proposition and changes taking place at the time. Four years after transitioning its sales model, we check in again for a progress report.

Subscribers should log-in below to read this article.